Trainer 

“Disciple Multiplier”


Trainers are much like Starters, but they go a step further: they equip their disciples to train others in the same way. As a result, they quickly see not only daughter churches but granddaughters and great-granddaughters as well which often appear in multiple streams. Trainers invest most heavily in believers who are faithful and effective.

The most typical representation of this level is Timothy. Paul urged him to invest in “faithful men who will be able to teach others also”(2 Tim 2.2b). No doubt, Timothy observed this coming to fruition in his own work.

Reaching Down: Help the  Starter  to Become a  Trainer 

If you are a Trainer, you've not only started multiple groups but you have raised up disciples that have gone out to do the same. A key part of your work is to find Starters and help them to become Trainers as well, so help them work through the Starter training.

Reaching Up: Moving from  Trainer  to  Catalyst 

Trainers are highly influential, but they can have world-reaching effects by transcending the  Exit Barrier . This propels them into a place of broader reach, both geographically and demographically. Find a few Catalytic workers who can spur you on and help you to develop these broader skills.

Skills and activities that will help you move Trainers to become Catalysts:

Accountability to One Another
  • Meet with pastors or church leaders in your area to encourage them and to cast vision for discple-making movements
  • Find Starters to be a model for them (let them use Models)
  • Spend 20 hours with Catalysts, observing how they do their work, using Models
  • Participate in an Iron-on-Iron event
Intimacy with God
Multiplication of the Kingdom

Key:
  one-on-one activity
  best done as a group exercise
  something disciples can do on their own

A disciple becomes a  Catalyst  when they step away from a movement—entrusting it to the local leaders—to become involved in other movements.

 

“If we call everything missions, we don't get to those who have never heard.” - Elbert Smith